Stock Fish Rack | sculpture

Description: A sculpture reflecting Kings Lynn’s medieval trading links with the Hanseatic League, which controlled trade in the Baltic and North Sea between the 13th and 17th Centuries.

At 3.2m tall, the sculpture comprises two racks filled with fish hanging out to dry (along with the odd bit of seaweed and a mermaids bra). It represents the history of ‘stock fish’, the name given to dried cod, that used to constitute a flourishing trade on the quay alongside the Great Ouse River in Kings Lynn. The fish came from the Lofoten Islands north of Bergen, where it was dried on racks, a centuries old process that produced a top grade product with high concentrations of protein. As far back as 1300 it was carried to Lynn and Boston in Hanseatic ships from where it was distributed inland, mainly by river. The sculpture was a collaborative project organised and made by 150 members of the British Artist Blacksmith Association (BABA). By working together participants were able to share the knowledge, experience and fellowship that BABA feel is necessary to maintain and forward the art of blacksmithing.

Service: Concept Design

Client: West Norfolk Council

Location: Kings Lynn, Norfolk